We welcome blogs on issues across Science, Technology, Research and Innovation, and on the activities of the Foundation. To publish a blog on this site, please email Gavin Costigan (gavin.costigan@foundation.org.uk).

The double face of research in low and middle-income countries – facing the pandemic

In the amidst of a pandemic, we must not forget the other health challenges that continue to face the world. Kirsty Le Doare writes about maternal and newborn infectious disease in low and middle- income countries in light of Covid-19.

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X marks the Pandemic

Disease X was prophesied by the World Health Organisation, and now it is here in the form of Covid-19. Alana Cullen discusses why pandemics are set to increase, and the story of Coronavirus.

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To glove or not to glove: a timely history of hand hygiene

Gloves- a barrier to disease, or an emotional comfort when faced with disease? Dr Fay Bound Alberti discusses the history of hand washing and the role of gloves in medical history.

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On the effect of Black Swans on projects

Black Swan events happen infrequently but when they do, have a high impact. Alan Mosca explains the current risk analysis systems, and the potential for better ones which encompass these Black Swans.

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A Case for the Frequent Flyer Levy

With the climate crisis growing, governments are having to debate ways to help cut their carbon emissions; and introducing a Frequent Flyer Levy could be the way forward.

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A positive case for Drones

With all the bad press surrounding drones, Gavin Costigan explores the positive impacts they could have on society, with the right privacy and security regulations in place.

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Facial recognition technology, history and the meanings of the face

With facial recognition technologies being increasingly commonplace, Dr Fay Bound Alberti discusses the use of such technologies, the ethics surrounding them, as well as the historical relevance of the issues faced.

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Time to Let Go of the Two Cultures?

Nineteenth-century philosopher and social theorist Auguste Comte famously proposed “that there is one kind of objective knowledge in the world, and that the natural sciences have shown in practice what it is” (Smith, 2007: 93). Would that it were so simple.

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